dailysudoku.com Forum Index dailysudoku.com
Discussion of Daily Sudoku puzzles
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Rambling: DP ???

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    dailysudoku.com Forum Index -> Puzzles by daj
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
daj95376



Joined: 23 Aug 2008
Posts: 3855

PostPosted: Tue Dec 21, 2010 11:55 pm    Post subject: Rambling: DP ??? Reply with quote

Normally, I'd describe the following as two overlapping UR patterns. In light of recent discussions, I'm now tempted to describe it as a DP pattern.

Code:
 +-----------------------+
 | . 3 . | 6 9 7 | . 5 . |
 | . . . | 8 . . | 3 7 2 |
 | . . 7 | 2 . 5 | . 9 . |
 |-------+-------+-------|
 | 3 6 . | . 7 . | 5 . . |
 | 5 . . | 3 4 2 | . 1 6 |
 | . 4 . | . 6 . | . 3 . |
 |-------+-------+-------|
 | . . . | . . . | 7 8 . |
 | . 5 . | 7 . . | 1 . 3 |
 | . . . | . . 3 | . . . |
 +-----------------------+

 after basics:  w/ineffective DP ?
 +--------------------------------------------------------------+
 |  124   3     1248  |  6     9     7     |  48    5     148   |
 |  6     9     5     |  8     1     4     |  3     7     2     |
 |  148   18    7     |  2     3     5     |  6     9     148   |
 |--------------------+--------------------+--------------------|
 |  3     6    *18+2  |  9     7    *18    |  5     24    48    |
 |  5     7    *89    |  3     4     2     | *89    1     6     |
 |  189-2 4    *189+2 |  5     6    *18    | *89+2  3     7     |
 |--------------------+--------------------+--------------------|
 |  19    12    3     |  4     25    6     |  7     8     59    |
 |  48    5     468   |  7     28    9     |  1     26    3     |
 |  7     28    689   |  1     258   3     |  24    246   59    |
 +--------------------------------------------------------------+
 # 47 eliminations remain

Code:
 exclude the "+2" candidates:  DP ?
 +-----------------------------------------------+
 |   .   .   .   |   .   .   .   |   .   .   .   |
 |   .   .   .   |   .   .   .   |   .   .   .   |
 |   .   .   .   |   .   .   .   |   .   .   .   |
 |---------------+---------------+---------------|
 |   .   .  18   |   .   .  18   |   .   .   .   |
 |   .   .   89  |   .   .   .   |   89  .   .   |
 |   .   .  189  |   .   .  18   |   89  .   .   |
 |---------------+---------------+---------------|
 |   .   .   .   |   .   .   .   |   .   .   .   |
 |   .   .   .   |   .   .   .   |   .   .   .   |
 |   .   .   .   |   .   .   .   |   .   .   .   |
 +-----------------------------------------------+

 scenario r4c3=1  =>  <89> DP
 +-----------------------------------------------+
 |   .   .   .   |   .   .   .   |   .   .   .   |
 |   .   .   .   |   .   .   .   |   .   .   .   |
 |   .   .   .   |   .   .   .   |   .   .   .   |
 |---------------+---------------+---------------|
 |   .   .  1    |   .   .   8   |   .   .   .   |
 |   .   .   89  |   .   .   .   |   89  .   .   |
 |   .   .   89  |   .   .  1    |   89  .   .   |
 |---------------+---------------+---------------|
 |   .   .   .   |   .   .   .   |   .   .   .   |
 |   .   .   .   |   .   .   .   |   .   .   .   |
 |   .   .   .   |   .   .   .   |   .   .   .   |
 +-----------------------------------------------+

 scenario r4c3=8  =>  <18> DP
 +-----------------------------------------------+
 |   .   .   .   |   .   .   .   |   .   .   .   |
 |   .   .   .   |   .   .   .   |   .   .   .   |
 |   .   .   .   |   .   .   .   |   .   .   .   |
 |---------------+---------------+---------------|
 |   .   .   8   |   .   .  1    |   .   .   .   |
 |   .   .    9  |   .   .   .   |   8   .   .   |
 |   .   .  1    |   .   .   8   |    9  .   .   |
 |---------------+---------------+---------------|
 |   .   .   .   |   .   .   .   |   .   .   .   |
 |   .   .   .   |   .   .   .   |   .   .   .   |
 |   .   .   .   |   .   .   .   |   .   .   .   |
 +-----------------------------------------------+

Conclusion: ( r4c3,r6c7=2 or r6c3=2 ) => r6c1<>2

BTW: The solution to this puzzle does not contain a UR pattern anywhere!

Code:
 +-----------------------+
 | 2 3 4 | 6 9 7 | 8 5 1 |
 | 6 9 5 | 8 1 4 | 3 7 2 |
 | 8 1 7 | 2 3 5 | 6 9 4 |
 |-------+-------+-------|
 | 3 6 2 | 9 7 1 | 5 4 8 |
 | 5 7 8 | 3 4 2 | 9 1 6 |
 | 9 4 1 | 5 6 8 | 2 3 7 |
 |-------+-------+-------|
 | 1 2 3 | 4 5 6 | 7 8 9 |
 | 4 5 6 | 7 8 9 | 1 2 3 |
 | 7 8 9 | 1 2 3 | 4 6 5 |
 +-----------------------+
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Marty R.



Joined: 12 Feb 2006
Posts: 5770
Location: Rochester, NY, USA

PostPosted: Wed Dec 22, 2010 1:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
I used two flightless M-Wings and I don't recall if the first was needed.

M-Wing (24); r7c1<>4
M-Wing (48); r89c8<>4
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Steve R



Joined: 24 Oct 2005
Posts: 289
Location: Birmingham, England

PostPosted: Thu Dec 23, 2010 3:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Danny

Resist the temptation!

All the graves I have seen, whether universal or light, bi- or multi-valent, share two characteristics. They imply that the pattern has no solution or gives rise to more than one solution and the implication is proved by assuming there is a solution and exhibiting a permutation of the candidates that derives a second solution from the first.

The uniqueness rectangle provides the simplest example:

Code:
+-------------------------------------------------+
 |   ab   .   .   |   ab   .   .   |   .   .   .   |
 |   .    .   .   |   .    .   .   |   .   .   .   |
 |   ab   .   .   |   ab   .   .   |   .   .   .   |
 |-------------------------------------------------|

This pattern always offers a solution unless a = b and transposing a and b preserves the candidates in each cell of the pattern so, whichever solution we start with, the transposition gives another.

Letís try that with your pattern, repeated for convenience:

Code:
 +-----------------------------------------------+
 |   .   .   .   |   .   .   .   |   .   .   .   |
 |   .   .   .   |   .   .   .   |   .   .   .   |
 |   .   .   .   |   .   .   .   |   .   .   .   |
 |---------------+---------------+---------------|
 |   .   .   18  |   .   .  18   |   .   .   .   |
 |   .   .   89  |   .   .   .   |   89  .   .   |
 |   .   .  189  |   .   .  18   |   89  .   .   |
 |---------------+---------------+---------------|
 |   .   .   .   |   .   .   .   |   .   .   .   |
 |   .   .   .   |   .   .   .   |   .   .   .   |
 |   .   .   .   |   .   .   .   |   .   .   .   |
 +-----------------------------------------------+

Assume there is a solution. Any permutation of the candidates which changes the solution in box 6 must transpose 1 and 8. However, this does not preserve the candidates in box 7. Similarly, transposing 8 and 9 (from box 7) doesnít preserve the candidates in box 6. So no permutation can alter the solution in boxes 6 and 7/ that is, the only permutation available is the identity, fixing 1, 8 and 9. But then the solution on box 3 is unaltered as well.

There is a similar problem with a pattern which Ron calls a bivalent grave:

Code:
 .  .  .  | .  .  .  | ab ab . 
 ab ab .  | .  .  .  | .  .  . 
 .  .  .  | .  .  .  | .  .  . 
----------+----------+----------
 .  ac .  | .  .  .  | ac .  . 
 .  .  .  | .  .  ac | .  ac . 
 ac .  .  | .  .  ac | .  .  . 
----------+----------+----------
 .  bc .  | .  .  .  | .  bc . 
 .  .  .  | .  .  .  | .  .  . 
 bc .  .  | .  .  .  | bc .  .

Any permutation of (abc) which preserves the candidates in box 1 must be a transposition of a and b, so leaving c fixed and altering the candidates in box 3 to bc. Similarly, any permutation which preserves box 3 alters the candidates in box 1.

The two patterns concerned may be useful to solvers. If they are, they deserve a name. My argument is that the underlying structure differs so markedly from what up to now have been called deadly patterns/graves that a different name is required.

Steve
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
peterj



Joined: 26 Mar 2010
Posts: 974
Location: London, UK

PostPosted: Thu Dec 23, 2010 9:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I am surprised to hear an objection to Danny's MUG which looks like a canonical example to me! (But what do I know!) This thread on the players forum gives the case of two overlapping UR's as its first example here. I don't know if this is the first discussion on MUGs - probably not.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
ronk



Joined: 07 May 2006
Posts: 398

PostPosted: Fri Dec 24, 2010 1:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Steve R wrote:
There is a similar problem with a pattern which Ron calls a bivalent grave:

Code:
 .  .  .  | .  .  .  | ab ab . 
 ab ab .  | .  .  .  | .  .  . 
 .  .  .  | .  .  .  | .  .  . 
----------+----------+----------
 .  ac .  | .  .  .  | ac .  . 
 .  .  .  | .  .  ac | .  ac . 
 ac .  .  | .  .  ac | .  .  . 
----------+----------+----------
 .  bc .  | .  .  .  | .  bc . 
 .  .  .  | .  .  .  | .  .  . 
 bc .  .  | .  .  .  | bc .  .

Any permutation of (abc) which preserves the candidates in box 1 must be a transposition of a and b, so leaving c fixed and altering the candidates in box 3 to bc. Similarly, any permutation which preserves box 3 alters the candidates in box 1.

Who or what says that is a requirement?

Better yet, have you a counter-example, preferably with pencilmarks from an actual puzzle, that shows such an application of the BUG rule leading to an invalid elimination?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    dailysudoku.com Forum Index -> Puzzles by daj All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group