dailysudoku.com Forum Index dailysudoku.com
Discussion of Daily Sudoku puzzles
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Nightmare, July 27

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    dailysudoku.com Forum Index -> Other puzzles
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
David Bryant



Joined: 29 Jul 2005
Posts: 559
Location: Denver, Colorado

PostPosted: Fri Jul 28, 2006 1:58 am    Post subject: Nightmare, July 27 Reply with quote

This is a very interesting puzzle. Here's the initial setup. Oh -- you can find the original puzzle on Ruud's "Nightmare" web site.
Code:
 *-----------*
 |...|3.6|59.|
 |...|.5.|..4|
 |..6|..9|..3|
 |---+---+---|
 |3..|.1.|9.5|
 |7..|..4|.2.|
 |..1|5..|..7|
 |---+---+---|
 |.4.|2..|1..|
 |9.7|...|...|
 |.2.|.65|...|
 *-----------*

I was able to solve this one with two relatively short double-implication chains plus a "non-unique rectangle." Or, without assuming uniquity, I got there via a third DIC.

Interestingly, when I ran this Nightmare through Ruud's "SudoCue" program, it produced the following series of unusual moves.

Finned Jellyfish (on "8"s)
Connected pair (aka multicoloring) on "8"
6 candidates (for "8") eliminated by "template check" (aka Nishio)
XY-Wing
Plus two forcing chains

I had a hard time locating the "finned jellyfish" even after I knew that it was there. And I never did figure out how to eliminate 6 candidates using Nishio -- I could only find 5.

Anyway, if anybody else has worked through this puzzle, I'd be interested in seeing how you did it. I'll post my own (relatively simple) solution in another day or two. dcb


Last edited by David Bryant on Sun Jul 30, 2006 8:58 pm; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
keith



Joined: 19 Sep 2005
Posts: 3178
Location: near Detroit, Michigan, USA

PostPosted: Fri Jul 28, 2006 9:27 pm    Post subject: Hiddden pairs? Reply with quote

Another interesting thing about this puzzle:

There are two hidden pairs which you can find from the initial clues without making lists of candidates. Can you see them? (Hints below.)

=

=

=

=

=

The pairs are <39> and <24>.

=

=

=

=

=

=

=

They are in Box 1 and Box 4. Much easier to find, I think, from the solved cells than from the candidate lists (pencil marks).

Keith
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Myth Jellies



Joined: 27 Jun 2006
Posts: 64

PostPosted: Sat Jul 29, 2006 7:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here is mine. Catching a jellyfish is kinda cool.
Code:
 *-----------------------------------------------------------*
 | 18a   178a  4     | 3    *78A   6     | 5     9     2     |
 | 2     39    39    | 178   5     178   | 678   68b   4     |
 | 5    *78A   6     | 4     2     9     | 78a   1     3     |
 |-------------------+-------------------+-------------------|
 | 3     68    2     | 678   1     78    | 9     4     5     |
 | 7     5689  589   | 689   389   4     | 368   2     1     |
 | 4    -689   1     | 5    -389   2     | 368  *68B   7     |
 |-------------------+-------------------+-------------------|
 | 6     4     358   | 2     789   378   | 1     357   89    |
 | 9     1358  7     | 18    4     138   | 2     35    6     |
 | 18    2     38    | 1789  6     5     | 4     37    89    |
 *-----------------------------------------------------------*

Grouped multicoloring on the 8's.
8A=8a-8b=8B => any cell which sees all the 8A's in a group and 8B's in a group cannot be an 8. r6c25 <> 8. Locked 8's in r6 => r5c7 <> 8
Code:
 *-----------------------------------------------------------*
 |*18   -178  *4     | 3    *78    6     | 5     9    *2     |
 | 2     39    39    | 178   5     178   | 678   68    4     |
 | 5     78    6     | 4     2     9     | 78    1     3     |
 |-------------------+-------------------+-------------------|
 | 3     68    2     | 678   1     78    | 9     4     5     |
 |*7    -5689 *589   |-689  *389   4     | 36    2    *1     |
 | 4     69    1     | 5     39    2     | 368   68    7     |
 |-------------------+-------------------+-------------------|
 |*6     4    *358   | 2    *789  -378   | 1     357  *89    |
 | 9     1358  7     | 18    4     138   | 2     35    6     |
 |*18    2    *38    |-1789 *6     5     | 4     37   *89    |
 *-----------------------------------------------------------*
r1579c1359 jellyfish on 8s => r1c2, r5c2, r5c4, r7c6, & r9c4 <> 8
Code:
 *-----------------------------------------------------------*
 | 18    17    4     | 3     78    6     | 5     9     2     |
 | 2     39    39    | 178   5     178   | 678   68    4     |
 | 5     78    6     | 4     2     9     | 78    1     3     |
 |-------------------+-------------------+-------------------|
 | 3     68    2     | 678   1     78    | 9     4     5     |
 | 7     569   589   |*69   -389   4     |*36    2     1     |
 | 4     69    1     | 5    *39    2     |-368   68    7     |
 |-------------------+-------------------+-------------------|
 | 6     4     358   | 2     789   37    | 1     357   89    |
 | 9     1358  7     | 18    4     138   | 2     35    6     |
 | 18    2     38    | 179   6     5     | 4     37    89    |
 *-----------------------------------------------------------*

XY-Wing: 36-69-93 in r5c7, r5c4, r6c5 => r5c5 & r6c7 <> 3
Basic moves take you to...
Code:
 *--------------------------------------------------*
 | 18   17   4    | 3    78   6    | 5    9    2    |
 | 2    3    9    | 178  5    178  |*678 *68   4    |
 | 5    78   6    | 4    2    9    | 78   1    3    |
 |----------------+----------------+----------------|
 | 3    68   2    | 678  1    78   | 9    4    5    |
 | 7    56   58   | 69   89   4    | 3    2    1    |
 | 4    9    1    | 5    3    2    |*68  *68   7    |
 |----------------+----------------+----------------|
 | 6    4    358  | 2    789  37   | 1    357  89   |
 | 9    158  7    | 18   4    138  | 2    35   6    |
 | 18   2    38   | 179  6    5    | 4    37   89   |
 *--------------------------------------------------*
68-UR in r26c78 sets r2c7 = 7. More basic stuff, then...
Code:
 *--------------------------------------------------*
 | 8    1    4    | 3    7    6    | 5    9    2    |
 | 2    3    9    |*18   5   *18   | 7    6    4    |
 | 5    7    6    | 4    2    9    | 8    1    3    |
 |----------------+----------------+----------------|
 | 3    68   2    | 67   1    78   | 9    4    5    |
 | 7    56   58   | 69   89   4    | 3    2    1    |
 | 4    9    1    | 5    3    2    | 6    8    7    |
 |----------------+----------------+----------------|
 | 6    4    35   | 2    89   37   | 1    357  89   |
 | 9    58   7    |*18   4   *138  | 2    35   6    |
 | 1    2    38   | 79   6    5    | 4    37   89   |
 *--------------------------------------------------*
18-UR in r28c46 sets r8c6 = 3 & cracks it
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
David Bryant



Joined: 29 Jul 2005
Posts: 559
Location: Denver, Colorado

PostPosted: Sat Jul 29, 2006 4:31 pm    Post subject: Using DICs to solve this one Reply with quote

Thanks for the explanation, MJ. Your method makes more sense (to me) than the one that "SudoCue" comes up with. Here's how I went about it -- double-implication chains are among my favorite tools. Smile

Right at the outset it appears that the key to solving this puzzle lies in the placement of the digit "9".
Code:
  .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .
  .     9?    9?    .     .     .     .     .     .
  .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .
  .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .
  .     9?    9?    9?    9?    .     .     .     .
  .     9?    .     .     9?    .     .     .     .
  .     .     .     .     9?    .     .     .     9?
  .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .     .
  .     .     .     9?    .     .     .     .     9?

We can see immediately that placing a "9" at r9c9 will determine the placement of all the rest of the "9"s:

r9c9 = 9 ==> r7c5 = 9 ==> r5c4 = 9 ==> r6c2 = 9 ==> r2c3 = 9

After making all the more or less obvious moves I arrived at this position. Oh -- this is exactly the same spot where MJ started the multicoloring on the digit "8".
Code:
  18*  178    4     3     78    6     5     9     2
  2     39    39   178    5    178   678    68    4
  5     78    6     4     2     9     78    1     3
  3     68    2    678    1     78    9     4     5
  7    5689  589   689   389    4    368    2     1
  4    689    1     5    389    2    368    68    7
  6     4    358    2    789   378    1    357    89
  9    1358   7     18    4    138    2     35    6
  18    2     38*  1789   6     5     4     37    89

I spotted two different double-implication chains here, both tying into the network of "9"s.

A. r9c3 = 3 ==> r2c3 = 9
B. r9c3 = 8 ==> r9c9 = 9 ==> ... r2c3 = 9 (see discussion above)

A. r1c1 = 1 ==> r9c1 = 8 ==> r9c9 = 9
B. r1c1 = 1 ==> {7, 8} pair in column 2 ==> r4c2 = 6 ==> {7, 8} pair in row 4
{7, 8} in row 4 ==> {3, 9} pair in column 5 ==> r7c5 <> 9 ==> r9c4 = 9

So placing a "1" in r1c1 forces a contradiction -- we can set r1c1 = 8, and r3c3 = 9. This forces a long series of simple moves, ending here. (This position is substantially similar to the last position MJ posted above, except that mine hasn't yet resolved row 6, and I also have more possible "8"s floating around.)
Code:
  8     1     4     3     7     6     5     9     2
  2     3     9     18    5     18    7     6     4
  5     7     6     4     2     9     8     1     3
  3     68    2    678    1     78    9     4     5
  7    5689   58   689   389    4    36     2     1
  4     69    1     5     39    2    36     8     7
  6     4     35    2     89    37    1    357    89
  9     58    7     18    4    138    2     35    6
  1     2     38   789    6     5     4     37    89

Now the "UR" in r28c46 is enough to solve the puzzle (via r8c6 = 3). Or, if we'd rather not depend on uniquity, we can use one more double implication chain.

A. r7c6 = 3 ==> r7c3 = 5 ==> r5c3 = 8 ==> r4c2 = 6
B. r7c6 = 7 ==> r4c6 = 8 ==> r4c2 = 6

And r4c2 = 6 is also enough to solve the rest of the puzzle. dcb
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Chuck B



Joined: 24 Jun 2006
Posts: 24

PostPosted: Sat Jul 29, 2006 7:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

After reaching MJ's first position I found that hypothesizing r1c1=1 forces a contradiction:

?r1c1=1 -> r4c2=6 -> ( r4c46={78}, r5c4=6 ) -> r56c5={39}
?r1c1=1 -> r9c1=8 -> r9c9=9 -> r7c5=9 ?! (i.e., two 9's in c5)

So the puzzle is valid only if r1c1 = 8.

Setting r1c1=8 and following the bread crumbs eventually leads here:
Code:
 *-----------------------------------------------------------*
 | 8     1     4     | 3     7     6     | 5     9     2     |
 | 2     39    39    |*18    5    *18    | 7     6     4     |
 | 5     7     6     | 4     2     9     | 8     1     3     |
 |-------------------+-------------------+-------------------|
 | 3    *68    2     |*678   1    *78    | 9     4     5     |
 | 7     5689  589   | 689   389   4     | 36    2     1     |
 | 4     69    1     | 5     39    2     | 36    8     7     |
 |-------------------+-------------------+-------------------|
 | 6     4     358   | 2     89    378   | 1     357   89    |
 | 9    *358   7     |*18    4    *138   | 2     35    6     |
 | 1     2     38    | 789   6     5     | 4     37    89    |
 *-----------------------------------------------------------*


A swordfish in 8 (rows 2, 4 & 8), followed eventually by a pair of XY wings, cracks it.

Nice one, David - thanks for posting it!

- cb
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    dailysudoku.com Forum Index -> Other puzzles All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group