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2 June 06 Monster, v. hard

 
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Glassman



Joined: 21 Oct 2005
Posts: 50
Location: England

PostPosted: Sat Sep 16, 2006 3:42 am    Post subject: 2 June 06 Monster, v. hard Reply with quote

David et al —

I've been stuck on this one now for about three months. Usually I find that coming back with a fresh mind helps, but this one refuses to budge.

The 0C pair in R14 has eliminated many possibilities in R13–15, and I noticed that the 8s split nicely in C9–12, but R3–5 are a real jumble.

Where I am:
Code:
5C1E .9DA 02F4 678.
.374 ..CF ...6 .A09
.... ...6 ..9C .4..
.9.6 .4E. B... .C.F

9..7 .1.D .4.0 F2C6
465. F.08 A.2. 79BD
EBD. 2637 FC.9 A054
.... ..48 6B.. 38E1

3760 9.8C 4F.. .B.A
C5ED 7A1B 3962 8F40
824A ...5 1.0B 937C
1FB9 4.2. C.A. D56E

F4.. ...2 91C. 0EA7
7192 ...E D.B. 46F.
0DC. ...4 26E. B19.
6EAB ..91 704. CD32

A hint would be very welcome. Or have I made a mistake? Embarassed

David — while I am on-air, I had to ask:-

Do your ancestors include either Andrew, the cartographer, or William, the matchmaker (in a literal sense)?

Glassman Cool
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David Bryant



Joined: 29 Jul 2005
Posts: 559
Location: Denver, Colorado

PostPosted: Sat Sep 16, 2006 10:48 pm    Post subject: I don't know Reply with quote

Hi, Glassman! Haven't heard from you in quite a while.

I'll take a look at the June 2nd Monster puzzle -- I don't often do the big ones, because they take too long. Sad

As to my ancestors, I honestly don't know. I do know that my (11 x great)-grandfather was named Thomas Bryant, and he emigrated to Connecticut in 1630, or thereabouts. I also know that any connection between my branch of the Bryant family and William Cullen Bryant (probably the most famous American with the Bryant name) must lie in England before 1600, because he wasn't descended from Thos. Bryant. But that's all I know about it. dcb

PS Oh -- I looked up my family's name in the library a few years ago, and found a reference to one Mary Bryant, who escaped from Botany Bay sometime in the 18th century, and sailed a small wooden boat all the way to Java, or Sumatra -- the Dutch East Indies, at any rate. Have you heard of her?
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Glassman



Joined: 21 Oct 2005
Posts: 50
Location: England

PostPosted: Sun Sep 17, 2006 4:39 am    Post subject: Re: I don't know Reply with quote

David — Like you, I don't usually do the 16x16 sudokus, but this time I went on holiday and printed out a few spares just in case I ran out of 9x9s and 12x12s. I think you will find this particular 16x16 quite enjoyable.

I've never heard of Mary Bryant, but she sounds a great character.

Andrew Bryant is one of my great heroes, along with his competitors Christopher & John Greenwood, who commissioned surveys and produced the first large scale maps at the amazing scale of between 1½" and 2" to the mile, although he went out of business in 1835 due to the increasing difficulty in competing with the government-supported Ordnance Survey. Between them, they surveyed and published large scale maps of all the English counties except Cambridgeshire. I've had the good fortune to have had two Bryant county maps through my hands, both de-luxe dissected and mounted into slip cases. His 1824 2-sheet map of Buckinghamshire took four trestle tables to display at a major antique fair, and was much admired as the vibrant hand-colouring was as fresh as the day it was made. It sold.

Should you ever wish to own a Bryant, you will find that most of his dozen or so county maps have been re-printed and are available either tubed or folded (usually from the County Records Office). They had to be, as these maps are a unique and valuable source for both the historian and the archaeologist, containing much detail unavailable elsewhere. Originals are very expensive today.

Glassman Cool
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Steve R



Joined: 24 Oct 2005
Posts: 289
Location: Birmingham, England

PostPosted: Sun Sep 17, 2006 12:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, Glassman, it’s good to hear from you again. Dare I say that the cartographical chat is a good deal more interesting than the puzzle?

As to the latter, the position you posted is correct apart from a typo: r8c8 contains 9.

It is here that the trick comes. You will find that 6 and D are excluded from all but two of the empty cells in the fifth column.

Steve
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Glassman



Joined: 21 Oct 2005
Posts: 50
Location: England

PostPosted: Mon Sep 18, 2006 10:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Steve R wrote:
... the position you posted is correct apart from a typo: r8c8 contains 9. ...
Steve — One typo, despite checking it twice, plus one glaring error — I must be getting senile.
I wrote:
... at the amazing scale of between 1½" and 2" to the mile ...
That would have been amazing (and impossible — they didn't make paper that size then). I should have said between 1½ and 2 miles to the inch. Embarassed

Anyway, thanks. I don't know how I missed that pair. I had already convinced myself that it was something wierd and exotic that I was looking for, an xy-winged swordfish perhaps, or another of these strange mythical creatures.

... and a thought. If a mapmaker is a cartographer, and one who writes books about maps a cartobibliographer, what is one who writes books about cartobibliographies? A cartobibliobibliographer, perhaps?

Later ...
David — I looked up William Cullen Bryant, and found a great character. Too busy earning a living and influencing others to become a successful poet, but I suspect his surviving poetry is the better for it. Nice to see that he was a leading supporter of Lincoln, the author of my favourite English prose, the Gettysburg Address, although it is not really prose, more poetry, as you cannot help hum the tune as you read or hear it. Sad that so many websites are careless about its punctuation and even the actual words.

I think you could eliminate one Bryant from your family tree: Dr Frank Bryant, Lecturer of English, University of Liverpool.


Glassman Cool
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